JaysonLilleyHomegirl London pays homage to Jayson Lilley.  He takes iconic landmarks and everyday subject matters and literally transforms them into works of art.  His love of bold colours and strong graphic novel style combine to create a powerful picture.   No doubt you’ve seen his interpretation of Battersea Power Station and the Trellick Tower .  But it doesn’t stop there; he has also used mopeds, buses and the good old English breakfast as inspiration.  I asked Jayson a few questions …

Q: Tell me about your early career influences.

A: Big, bold and simple forms have always excited me; from my early career in advertising and design I have always had a ‘less is more’ attitude in my work.  I remember first visiting London to see an exhibition of contemporary artists and being really excited by the work of Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol and Julian Opie – particularly the way they use flat, strong, solid colour to produce their paintings.  My other love has always been architecture, admiring the flat lines of Le Corbusier’s, the beautiful structures of the art deco period and designers / architects like Sir Gilbert Scott.

Q: How would you sum up your signature style?

A: I love using bright, solid colours with vivid contrasts.  I reduce the subject matter to the absolute minimum so that I retain only the most important information; light, form and the very key features.  I always look for a strong light source which casts shadows and silhouette.

Q: Where do you get your design inspiration from?

A: All my inspiration comes from walking around the streets of London.  I love looking up at a building and seeing the light hit it in different ways depending on the time of day and thinking “that would make a great painting.”  I love very early mornings and late dusk evenings when the sun is very low in the sky and casts shadows across urban landscapes – it makes some buildings just come alive.

Q: What is your favourite London building / why is it your favourite?

A: By far my favourite London building has to be Battersea Power Station. Its sheer scale is so imposing on the landscape, with its four chimneys shooting into the sky.  I find it amazing how the art deco lines make your eyes follow the structure from the very bottom to the very top of the chimneys.  I love the fact that it used to produce all that power for London and now just stands there silent overlooking the hustle and bustle of city life.

Q: What has been your career highlight to date?

A: I still can’t believe I’m doing something that I love so much.  I feel so fortunate to be an artist that there can be no highlights.

Q: What’s coming up for the remainder of 2012?

A: I’m currently working on some new paintings of buildings in South London and will be producing some new screen prints of buildings in Central London for Pond Gallery in Clapham.  I am also currently in a group show in Parsons Green.  I will be at the Affordable Art Fair in Battersea in October and have my Open Studio show at www.wimbledonartstudios.co.uk later this year in November.

Below is a selection of Jayson’s work which you can buy from www.jaysonlilley.com.  Credits: text by Homegirl London, images courtesy of Jayson Lilley, special thanks to Jayson Lilley.

Battersea Power Station, Jayson Lilley,

Battersea Power Station

Oxo Tower, Wharf Barge House Street, Jayson Lilley

OXO Tower

POST OFFICE TOWER,

Post Office Tower

Truman Brewery, Jayson Lilley, screenprint, 90x40cm

Truman Brewery

Bow Quarter, Fairfield Rd Jayson Lilley, Painting 100x100cm

Bow Quarter

TRELLICK TOWER

Trellick Tower

Borough Market, Jayson Lilley, Painting 180x120cm

Borough Market

LONDON, SCREENPRINT,90x90cm, Jayson Lilley

London Screen-print

Bus, screenprint, jayson lilley

London Bus

Double Bubble, Garratt Lane, Jayson Lilley

Double Bubble Breakfast